Monthly Archives: July 2013

Having journals in science class

I’ve recently been interested in the idea of having journals be a part of Science class. When I was doing my short practicum, my Faculty Advisor had mentioned doing journals in class and definitely seeing a change in her students. The opportunity to allow students to explore, express, and reflect on the things that interest, intrigue, or frustrate them about science helped to keep them engaged. Helped to keep them invested, helped them to even understand science concepts better because they were routinely reflecting on what was learned. My FA did mention, however, that it was hard work to incorporate this aspect and although, when done properly, worked, she didn’t quite transition journals quite smoothly and it was more work than she anticipated. This whole idea totally and completely blew me away. I knew that I wanted to try it. Especially since, the whole process of becoming a teacher changed my whole perspective on being reflective. Heck, I’ve even started a blog, right? However, until I actually get my very own class to experiment on, my mentor for my long practicum has already shut down this idea. That’s okay. It’s quite a new concept especially in the Science/ Math classes and I totally understood.

Coming across Sam’s post about using journals in his class (http://samjshah.com/2012/09/22/a-high-school-math-science-journal/) had me really curious. His purpose of using the journals is to essentially learn what the students may find challenging or interesting and using this knowledge to create more outside of the box examples or activities. Hmmm. Had that been my intention, I would have likely done it this way too. Furthermore, Sam describes how the journals would work and to me, I sounds almost like a newspaper, with various students being the writers.

I do look forward to seeing how it works in his class, school. For me, however, I don’t think this is how I envisioned the journals looking. For someone like me who is incredibly private (ironic, since I have a blog), I would have loved to have a journal where I could communicate with my teachers and express to them my experiments, research, or curiosity, but laid out like the way described in the post, I would have gone in shut down mode. I’m not letting other people read it. I’m not going to say anything. What if it’s stupid? For these reasons alone, I think having private journals would be more effective. Having students be accountable for their own learning, reflection, thoughts, and understandings without the fear of having it go public, can more accurately and more meaningfully shed light on what activities and experiments can/should be done. I just think that having it be public where some students contribute will somehow take away from the students that can make meaningful connections but are too afraid/shy to.

Hmm.. Still a lot to think about but that’s my opinion.

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Community within the Blogosphere

http://reflectionsinthewhy.wordpress.com/2013/02/19/mathblogosphere-presentation/

My Math class ended today with a very sentimental goodbye from both us, the students, and Marc, my teacher. I took 5 courses this semester and out of the five, this Math course has been the most interesting and informative. This was perhaps my first Education course where we discussed practical activities and strategies we could integrate into our classes. In addition, Marc made the whole process extremely hands on; Less text book, theoretical, and more interactive. I love it. To say it was one of my better courses is truly an understatement. Out of my five years at university, it definitely holds as one of my favourite classes. I will forever be grateful for how he executed the class, the topics he chose, and his attitude. But one of the things I take away from his course is his emphasis on collaboration.

In the education stream, we always discuss collaboration and how it’s definitely a 21st skill that students need to learn. What Marc emphasizes is no different. He, however, discusses collaboration in the blogosphere, with fellow teachers, old and new. This was a super fascinating concept because when first brought up, I had never even considered this. I mean, of course, I had considered setting up a blog, twitter, and some sort of website to interact with my students outside of school. Deepening my relationships through media and technology. But, I had never even thought to perhaps reach out to fellow teachers across the keyboard.

This is still a very new concept to me. But, it is a very important one and in the future, I think, even more important. Today, as I said before is the last day of class. As I am writing this, I’m really sadden by that it. I won’t see many of my classmate for months, or if ever. And though, I only saw most once a week for about 4 hours, the short time we spent collaborating, working through problems, discussing different ways to teach, different strategies, different experiences, various tips, I will miss these moments. I will miss the moments where we are truly inspired by each other, and by ourselves. In those moments, I’ve never been more in love with my teacher profession than ever which is why the I chose the above blog post as a recommended read.

One of the most exciting aspects of being part of a new generation of teachers is the idea that we can have professional development days online whenever we want, whenever we can. Of course, face to face interaction is also essential, but I can see what that teacher from Tennessee presented on and read what was highlighted from that Pro-D in Washington, or that teacher from New York, how she made polynomials into a game. This is the new form of collaboration. A truly united front among teachers across the world. Sharing ideas, sharing thoughts; being a part of this new education system excites me. There are so many teachers across the country and world that are essentially sharing all their Yoda wisdom in blogosphere and I am overwelmed but honored to be able to read them. I know that I will never meet most, but somehow, I feel supported, I feel understood, and I feel inspired. Hopefully, in the near future, it is I that will reach other teachers through my blog.

I leave this post with a funny meme I came across. If only..

Heck, if I was a pirate, I would find me a Jack Sparrow pronto.

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The right moment to have read it.

As part of my on-going assignment, where I have to reflect on different blogs, which I’m appreciating more and more, I came across a post that honestly, is what I needed to read at this moment.

http://function-of-time.blogspot.ca/2013/01/if-you-are-confused-you-have-so-much.html

As my semester is winding down, classes are coming to a close, assignments are piling up, marks have become heavier, my stress load is rapidly increasing. Furthermore, the winding down of the semester also preludes to my upcoming practicum in September. And I’m terrified! I’m scared that I’m going to somehow royally screw this up. And I’ve wanted this for sooooo long! It would break my heart if I actually failed my practicum.

The other day, I was explaining to my friend why I felt the way that I did and she finally asked, “What is it that you think you will fail at?”. I remember saying to her, “There’s so many things that I know I’m horrible at and I’m scared that one of those things will limit my ability to teach.”

So, you can imagine my mind state when I finished reading Kate’s post.

And she said, “Kate, that is not true. I think you like being bad at things, because you like learning.”

I had never thought about things like that before. I actually had to step away from her blog post and for a several days, I kept thinking about what she said. I asked myself the same thing. Do I enjoy being bad at doing things so that I can be challenged to be better? Hmm. Does it give me a reason to actually improve myself? And thus, am incredibly harsh on myself?

I’m still not sure, but reading her blog gave me a different perspective on my fear. I am scared. Yes, there’s a lot that I’m horrible at. And yes, I’m terrified those aspects of me are going to limit my ability to teach. But at the end of the day, I’m still learning. Yes, I enjoy learning. Yes, I’m committed to becoming a better teacher. I’m learning to be a better teacher and that’s the best place to start anyway, right?

I would have loved to be in his class.

I’m referring to Andrew Stadel and his math class. (See link for details: http://mr-stadel.blogspot.ca/2012/06/estimation-is-key.html)

I would have loved to be in his class!

Why?

One: He had a hook. He took a picture of the parking lot and asked the kids to guess how many spaces were in the lot. The picture in itself is ordinary but the question, is quite profound. If I was in the class, especially on the first day, had he just asked the question, I probably wouldn’t have been as engaged. But the combination of the picture, which is part of the school, and the question that I’ve never even thought about before, would definitively have me thinking. I’m already hooked – which I guess is the point of a hook. Heh.

Two: Not just going into the topic right away, he discussed the pros and cons of making estimations. He could have easily gotten right into estimations since the students would have already been engaged. He, however, had the students come up with reasons why estimations were good and bad, and at the same time, validated what the students already knew about estimation and refreshed what some kids have not quite remembered. I like it. For me, as a student. I would have felt more confident knowing that estimations could be wrong.

Three: The fact that solving the problem was hands-on and visual fascinated me! He didn’t have the answer either! He asked a question that he wanted to find out and invited the students to join him on his adventure. As a student, I would have been excited knowing that we were all learning together!

Four: The fact that the lesson was so much more than estimation of numbers, but rather, how estimation is so much a part of our lives. We estimate everyday and not just in the classroom. He took them out of the class to experience a real-world estimation. He not only emphasized the importance of an estimate as being a starting point (doesn’t have to be correct), but also demonstrated how estimation/math also lives outside the four walls of a classroom. Loved it!

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Yes Yes!

So, since my last post, I’m sort of on a roll with reading different blogs. Mainly from other educators.

I came across a blog post that made me tear up and say, “Yes! I want that!”

http://mrvaudrey.com/2012/12/18/proof-my-class-culture-is-working/

The title alone says it all. “Proof my class culture is working”

My biggest goal when becoming a teacher is not getting the material across (that is one of my goals, just not my biggest) or even that they like me. No, my biggest, biggest goal when becoming a teacher is establishing a positive, safe, successful, respectfully, colourful class culture. More than anything, I want my students to be able to trust each other, respect each other, teach each other, and learn from one another. I want them to be confident with who they are and yet be invested in being apart of the class identity. It all seems vague and abstract and I’m sure a lot of you will be like, “That seems like a very unrealistic dream/fantasy/goal.” And yet, here we are, Well, here I am, telling you about a blog post in which a teacher has accomplished exactly that. A classroom where other students help validate the material learned. Where other students are inspiring, encouraging, and aiding other students. Where risks are taken and mistakes are an after thought. I love it. I teared up. And I am freakin’ inspired! Yes.

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Innovative Thinking

Math has always been easy for me. Heck, I was top of my class in every grade except Grade 12. I had a feisty Calculus teacher that didn’t quite mesh with me. She was incredibly nice, intelligent and very very passionate, but she wasn’t very patient. And if there’s anything I’ve learned so far in my teaching program, it’s how patient we, as educators, HAVE to be. In any case, the traditional approach worked for me. I thrived in this setting. I could work on my own, or work collaboratively but all in all, math wasn’t very hard for me. I never dreaded the class, I never had a problem with learning new concepts, and please, like as if I had to study for my exams. Essentially, I’ve never had to think about the way I learned Math until now.

Like my previous post, the teaching program is all about innovation. Finding ways to engage, to hook, to make things fun but also balance it with deep understanding of the concept, of Math. One reason why this is extremely, extremely difficult for me to accomplish is the fact that I don’t even have a deep understanding of Math. My math teacher in my program is excellent. He’s passionate, he’s animated, he’s so incredibly intelligent. But the one thing that stands out when you meet him is how deep his understanding of math is. If his different math shirts don’t tell you right away, once he gets into a concept, his ability to explain it in 600 different ways, beginning with 200 different angles, using 150 different tools, makes it contact clear. M knows his stuff inside out, right side up. And as inspiring as this is, it makes me insecure and intimidated. How will I ever be able to find ways to explain different concepts when I only know one way. In fact, there are times when my peers have explained their understanding in an extremely different way and I’m left picking my jaw off the ground. Say wwhhhattt? Again, this is not a new idea. I’ve written before about my insecurities in regards to innovative thinking. However, as part of our assignment in which we look at blogs to help find inspiration or reflection, I found one that helped me with my anxiety.

http://ispeakmath.wordpress.com/2012/09/21/algebra-vocabulary-with-dry-erase-necklaces/

The blogger for this post essentially made up an activity to help her student better understand algebraic terms. She made dry-erase necklaces and made a little game for her students to not only learn the terms but be invested in learning the terms. Her blog spot is just a reflection of her own practices. Up to this point, I had somehow made myself believe that I needed to figure this innovative stuff on my own. I needed to come up with activities, find ways myself. I needed to be smarter, braver, more creative. I had not realized how much I had put on my own shoulders. I failed to realize that there were many many teachers that became innovative through the internet world. The blogger mentioned, adopted most of her activities from other educators. There were times where she was also lost. I guess that is what makes a teacher. Not the ability have light bulb moments and have all things miraculously come to place. But instead, finding bulbs that already lit and figuring how to use them in your class.

She found activities that were successful and adapted them for her own class. She herself was lost. It’s something I have to wrap my head around and start to accept. I’m not somehow weak just because I’m lost. It’s still very hard to accept help, or inspiration when up to this point, when it came to my education process, I never had to. I am relieved to know that I am allowed, or that I’m finally allowing myself, to seek inspiration, creatively, and innovation elsewhere. Perhaps along the way, I myself, will come across my own brand of innovation.

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