Having journals in science class

I’ve recently been interested in the idea of having journals be a part of Science class. When I was doing my short practicum, my Faculty Advisor had mentioned doing journals in class and definitely seeing a change in her students. The opportunity to allow students to explore, express, and reflect on the things that interest, intrigue, or frustrate them about science helped to keep them engaged. Helped to keep them invested, helped them to even understand science concepts better because they were routinely reflecting on what was learned. My FA did mention, however, that it was hard work to incorporate this aspect and although, when done properly, worked, she didn’t quite transition journals quite smoothly and it was more work than she anticipated. This whole idea totally and completely blew me away. I knew that I wanted to try it. Especially since, the whole process of becoming a teacher changed my whole perspective on being reflective. Heck, I’ve even started a blog, right? However, until I actually get my very own class to experiment on, my mentor for my long practicum has already shut down this idea. That’s okay. It’s quite a new concept especially in the Science/ Math classes and I totally understood.

Coming across Sam’s post about using journals in his class (http://samjshah.com/2012/09/22/a-high-school-math-science-journal/) had me really curious. His purpose of using the journals is to essentially learn what the students may find challenging or interesting and using this knowledge to create more outside of the box examples or activities. Hmmm. Had that been my intention, I would have likely done it this way too. Furthermore, Sam describes how the journals would work and to me, I sounds almost like a newspaper, with various students being the writers.

I do look forward to seeing how it works in his class, school. For me, however, I don’t think this is how I envisioned the journals looking. For someone like me who is incredibly private (ironic, since I have a blog), I would have loved to have a journal where I could communicate with my teachers and express to them my experiments, research, or curiosity, but laid out like the way described in the post, I would have gone in shut down mode. I’m not letting other people read it. I’m not going to say anything. What if it’s stupid? For these reasons alone, I think having private journals would be more effective. Having students be accountable for their own learning, reflection, thoughts, and understandings without the fear of having it go public, can more accurately and more meaningfully shed light on what activities and experiments can/should be done. I just think that having it be public where some students contribute will somehow take away from the students that can make meaningful connections but are too afraid/shy to.

Hmm.. Still a lot to think about but that’s my opinion.

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One thought on “Having journals in science class

  1. Marc Garneau says:

    Great reflections on the positive results that can come from journaling. A couple of other things: first, it’s too bad your full practicum teacher has nixed the idea of doing journals, but as you say, it’s something worth developing and trying out once you get your own classroom – and there are plenty of other things to focus on during that time. Second, what Sam describes is something school-wide, I think, and completely up to students’ own initiative rather than a requirement, so they’re a bit different from what you’re hoping to do with your own students. I agree, for in-class journals, there does need to be that sense of privacy for them to be effective for some learners. Over time, I think, all students can become comfortable to share with a broader audience too. (2.5)

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